Remembering the deadliest tornado in Nashville’s history

Weather Stories

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — Nashville’s deadliest tornado killed a total of 11 people in the city and occurred on March 14, 1933.

This picture is in east Nashville of the old Bailey School auditorium where the walls were literally blown outward and the ceiling caved in. you can see the damage there.

Courtesy of the Journal of the Tennessee Academy of Science

The tornado first touched down near Charlotte and 51st Avenue with just light damage.

It then moved east down Charlotte Avenue and went right over the Tennessee State Capitol building, blowing out windows before crossing the Cumberland River right over the Woodland Street bridge into East Nashville where it widened…first to 200-400 yards in width, then to 500-800 yards wide, doing damaging or destroying numerous buildings and houses as an F-3 tornado with 158-207 mph winds.

It then continued into Donelson doing extensive damage as it crossed McGavock Lane (as it was called then) and down Lebanon Road, then lifting just shy of the county line before touching down once more in Wilson County and killing 4 more people.

The old pictures out of East Nashville were astounding.

This was known as the old Grissom home at the corner of 16th and Franklin.

Courtesy of the Journal of the Tennessee Academy of Science

This house was at the corner of Garland Avenue and Gallatin Road where five people were injured, some seriously.

Courtesy of the Journal of the Tennessee Academy of Science

In this home, a mother and her baby were injured. it looks virtually destroyed.

Courtesy of the Journal of the Tennessee Academy of Science

This is what it looked like on Calvin Avenue.

Courtesy of the Journal of the Tennessee Academy of Science

And also the Calvin Avenue Eastwood Christian church.

Courtesy of the Journal of the Tennessee Academy of Science

And check out these three pictures. the first two are of two by fours. one driven through a hackberry tree, the other through a door. and the third one is actually a corn stalk driven into the siding of a house.

Courtesy of the Journal of the Tennessee Academy of Science

And if the path of this tornado seems familiar to you, yes, it’s almost identical to the Nashville Tornado of April 16th, 1998.

April 16, 1998 Courtesy of the Davidson Co. Sheriff’s Department

It too came right down Charlotte Avenue and west end crossing the river into East Nashville where it strengthened to F-3 status.

But this time there was only one fatality. the hope is that the radar and warning system we have now, neither of which existed back then, is helping to save lives.

Copyright 2020 Nexstar Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Your Local Election HQ

More Your Local Election HQ



Don't Miss

Trending Stories