The Army Corps of Engineers working to manage local rivers after weekend flooding

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) —Much of Middle Tennessee experienced a flash flood emergency over the weekend as rising waters moved into homes and swept away vehicles. All of that water has to go somewhere and right now it’s draining into Middle Tennessee’s river system.  

Anthony Rodino, Nashville District Water Management Section Chief for the Army Corps of Engineers, spoke with News 2 about the threat of river flooding.

“I think people need to be aware that even though the rain has stopped, conditions aren’t necessarily, you know, steady yet,” Rodino said. “We’re still going to see rising conditions along the Cumberland River, they’re still going to be rising conditions like you mentioned in the Harpeth and other places throughout the basin that people need to be aware of. Even though it stopped raining, that doesn’t mean the river is going to stop rising at this point.”

The Army Corps of Engineers can store a lot of water in their reservoirs and keep it out of the Cumberland water system. 

“Our big focus right now is again on the main stem of the river. So we’re watching water levels very closely behind Cordell Hull dam and Old Hickory dam, basically trying to utilize every inch of space that we can to further mitigate rising stages in the areas downstream, including downtown Nashville,” Rodino said.

It’s important to note that not all waterways in our area can be managed.

“The Harpeth River is an uncontrolled system. So, unfortunately, there’s nothing that we can do to assist the Harpeth at this time,” Rodino said.

While much can be done to keep excess water out of the Cumberland River system, there is no way to control the flash flooding that occurs in creeks and streams.

Another storm system is expected to bring additional rainfall Tuesday night into Wednesday morning and more flooding is a concern.

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