New high-rise living space proposed for downtown Nashville

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — Nashville’s vibrant urban core continues to attract new developments.

In just 10 years, Nashville Downtown Partnership estimates 28,000 people will be living in greater downtown Nashville. It’s why local developer, Tony Giarratana, says the city needs to continue building high-rise homes.

“This downtown neighborhood we’ve been working so hard to create is part of Nashville’s long-term plan,” Giarratana said.

That plan is more than 25 years in the making with the first residential high-rise spaces that popped up in the 90s.

“We were trying to move Nashville from [an]eight-hour city to 12-hour city to its current position as a 18-hour city,” Giarratana said. “All of these residences for sale or for rent bring the downtown population to a tipping point and I think we are at that tipping point at 15,000 residences, where a lot of things become possible.”

His hope is that within the next 10 years Nashville will catapult into a city that never sleeps and we do that with more residential living.

New renderings show what’s next for Giarratana’s property at 800 Lea Avenue.

The property is currently a long-term surface parking lot. He says he intended to keep it that way until it was recently announced a Ritz Carlton hotel would be moving in just feet away.

“There are a lot of jobs being created in the downtown area with Amazon, Asurion, Oracle…we’re told it’s 32,000 jobs and if all those people are on highways on peak times getting in and out of downtown, we have an issue,” Giarratana said. “But if many of those people are making downtown home, working playing… they’re not even part of the problem, because they’re walking.”

Giarratana’s proposal submitted to Metro Council shows plans for a 45-story skyscraper off the Korean Veteran Blvd Circle on less than half an acre. The building would bring 125 new high-end condos to the area.

“They [Mitsubishi] have a technology that would make the entirety of the glass 25-feet-tall, a couple hundred feet long, all digital,” Giarratana said. “That artwork could be right there on the roundabout if metro approves something like that.”

Giarratana says the project already received site plan approval. Once a traffic study is submitted it heads to Metro Council.

“I’m excited about it,” Councilman Freddie O’Connell said. “We’re starting to see more buildings in downtown that are more architecturally interesting than just being glass boxes, and I’m thinking about how we create more incentives for better design and architecture.”

Giarratana hopes to break ground summer of 2022.

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