NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — Three people have been arrested after a months-long investigation into a human trafficking operation across Nashville.

Metro SWAT teams executed two search warrants simultaneously Thursday morning.

“The police department, over the last several months, has been investigating certain persons who we believed have been trafficking women for the purposes of prostitution in the Nashville area. Arrests will be made today,” said Don Aaron, spokesman for the Metro Police Department.

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Search warrants were issued on a makeshift recording studio on Fesslers Lane and a home on Bluewillow Court in Antioch.

Those arrested are Charles McGlother Jr. (50), his girlfriend, Karen Bailey (41), and Charles Sumner (60), all of whom live at the home on Bluewillow Court. All were arrested on Bluewillow Court Thursday and two women were also with the suspects. The women told police they were being trafficked.

“Not surprised honestly,” said Jolene, who lives a few doors down from the home. Jolene opted to conceal her identity.

Metro police say a tip from a victims’ advocacy group led detectives to begin looking closely at the suspects’ activities.

McGlother ran the small recording studio on Fesslers Lane that is believed to be connected to illegal activity, including drug sales, police say. While the Antioch home was searched, a warrant said police found a stolen handgun in McGlother’s room, along with 12 grams of heroin, three grams of crack cocaine, 13 grams of methamphetamine, 15 grams of marijuana, scales, and cash. No one was at the recording studio during the execution of the search warrant.

“We had heard years ago that they had been doing something like that,” said Jolene. “Taking them and getting them makeup and stuff, and getting them all dressed up, making them feel great and saying ‘now you gotta go work for it’.”

Jolene also told News 2 she’s relieved the suspects are now behind bars.

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“Absolutely. My poor daughter, she was raised so sheltered as a result,” said Jolene. “Literally she can’t really have a lot of conversation with strangers and stuff because of knowing about what’s going on around her. She was never allowed to walk to school or take the bus or anything.”