MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (WKRN) – Having a car is a must-have in much of Tennessee, especially in Clarksville and Murfreesboro. Those two cities made the list of worst places to live in the U.S. without a car, according to a new survey by LawnStarter.

When getting around Murfreesboro, Sammy Chapman prefers a skateboard over the bus, because he says it’s faster. However, he also worries about taking a spill.

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“There’s probably like a 2.5 inch ledge on all the curbs, whenever the sidewalk goes down there. It’s more for wheelchairs than it is for skateboards, so it’s very dangerous to be going fast,” said Chapman.

The LawnStarter survey looked at the 200 biggest cities to see which ones require a car to truly get around. Clarksville was number two on that list, and Murfreesboro came in seventh.

News 2 asked Darlene Haverlock if it’s easier getting around Murfreesboro on foot or in a car.

“A car,” she said. “Because it is a big wide span, and if you’re going from one end to the other, that’s approximately five, 10 miles. And if you’re going to work, getting there on your legs, you’re not going to get there on time.”

According to Jeff Herman, editor-in-chief with LawnStarter, researchers looked at pedestrian fatalities, crime, mass transit options, rideshare and biking options to come up with their ranking.

“If you live on a bus line, great! If you can walk to the bus line, great! But you don’t have quite those connections that we have around a bigger city,” said Herman.

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Murfreesboro said changes are coming. Plans are in the works for a new transit facility, new buses and possibly even additional routes. They are also looking into an app so riders can track their bus.

“It’s pretty rough. I would say, personally, I’ve had to resort to just getting around, finding transportation as I can,” said Caleb Mitchell, who lives in Murfreesboro.

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The interim director of Clarksville Transit Systems, Arthur Bing, said they have made improvements too, adding miles of sidewalk and 20 bus shelters. Still, not only is he up against COVID delays for new buses, but he’s short 10 bus drivers.

“It is upsetting because to me, I think we run a pretty good transit system here,” said Bing. “We need more vehicles to shorten the time a person has to wait for a bus.”