NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – Forget Oscars and critical acclaim.

There’s no denying America has a soft spot for “bad” movies, some of which go on to become cult classics despite poor reviews and low scores on Rotten Tomatoes. Enough with Oscars and Golden Globe accolades, this is all about the Golden Raspberry Awards – a parody award show honoring the worst of cinematic under-achievements.

To see which Golden Raspberry-worthy movies Tennesseans appear to enjoy most, CenturyLinkQuote compiled a list of the lowest-rated movies of all time using data from IMDb and Rotten Tomatoes, then analyzed data from Google Trends to determine which low-rated movie was most googled in each state.

The results revealed “Steel” to be Tennessee’s most searched low-rated movie. This 1997 superhero film is loosely based on the DC Comics character of the same name and stars NBA legend Shaquille O’Neal as John Henry Irons and his alter-ego Steel, Annabeth Gish as his wheelchair-using partner Susan Sparks, and Judd Nelson as their rival Nathaniel Burke.

The film was a box office bomb, earning just $1.7 million domestically with an estimated budget of $16 million.

Curious about the top low-rated movie in America? “Cats” from 2019 was searched most in eight states, despite its Rotten Tomatoes score of 19%, according to CenturyLinkQuote.

Here’s a list of the top 10 most searched low-rated movies in the country:

  1. “Cats” (2019)
    • IMDb: 2.8
    • Rotten Tomatoes: 19%
    • Most searched in eight states
  2. “Crossroads” (2002)
    • IMDb: 3.5
    • Rotten Tomatoes: 15%
    • Most searched in six states
  3. “Catwoman” (2004)
    • IMDb: 3.4
    • Rotten Tomatoes: 9%
    • Most searched in six states
  4. “365 Days” (2020)
    • IMDb: 3.3
    • Rotten Tomatoes: 0%
    • Most searched in six states
  5. “Jack & Jill” (2011)
    • IMDb: 3.3
    • Rotten Tomatoes: 3%
    • Most searched in four states
  6. “Slender Man” (2018)
    • IMDb: 3.2
    • Rotten Tomatoes: 8%
    • Most searched in four states
  7. “Steel” (1997)
    • IMDb: 3.2
    • Rotten Tomatoes: 12%
    • Most searched in four states
  8. “Bratz: The Movie” (2007)
    • IMDb: 3.0
    • Rotten Tomatoes: 10%
    • Most searched in three states
  9. “Epic Movie” (2007)
    • IMDb: 2.4
    • Rotten Tomatoes: 2%
    • Most searched in three states
  10. “The Room” (2003)
    • IMDb: 3.6
    • Rotten Tomatoes: 26%
    • Most searched in two states
  11. “Barb Wire” (1996)
    • IMDb: 3.4
    • Rotten Tomatoes: 28%
    • Most searched in one state
  12. “Captain America” (1990)
    • “IMDb: 3.2
    • Rotten Tomatoes: 13%
    • Most searched in one state
  13. “Gigli” (2003)
    • IMDb: 2.6
    • Rotten Tomatoes: 6%
    • Most searched in one state
  14. “Glitter” (2001)
    • IMDb: 2.3
    • Rotten Tomatoes: 6%
    • Most searched in one state
  15. “Disaster Movie” (2008)
    • IMDb: 1.9
    • Rotten Tomatoes: 1%
    • Most searched in one state

CenturyLinkQuote also noted some interesting findings in their research.

The low-rated films on their list have an average IMDb score of 3.0 and an average Rotten Tomatoes score of 11%.

Of all the movies on the list, 2008’s “Disaster Movie” had the lowest IMDb score of 1.9, while 2003’s “The Room” had the highest IMDb score of 3.6.

“365 Days” was the only movie on their list with a 0% score on Rotten Tomatoes.

| Check out more lists and rankings from across Tennessee

Halle Berry is one of only six actors in history to win both an Oscar and a Golden Raspberry (Razzie) thanks to her role in “Catwoman”, the second most searched movie in America.

Out of all the movies on the list, “Jack & Jill” has the most Razzies with 10 total wins. This film stars Adam Sandler in a dual role as twin siblings Jack and Jill Sadelstein, with Jack being a former Los Angeles advertising executive being visited for Thanksgiving by Jill who is from the Bronx. “Jack & Jill” is considered by some to the one of the worst films ever made; not even Al Pacino’s performance in this movie could save it. The movie also features the final film performance of Regis Philbin, an interesting way to end your movie acting career to say the least.