Clarksville, Montgomery County issue their own ‘shelter-in-place’ orders

Coronavirus

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Tenn. (WKRN) — The Montgomery County Mayor and the Clarksville Mayor are taking matters into their own hands by issuing ‘shelter-in-place’ orders.

The mayors say while they have seen extraordinary cooperation from the community so far, issuing a ‘shelter-in-place’ order is the next logical step to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Clarksville Mayor Joe Pitts admits it was a difficult decision, but necessary to further protect the community.

“Given the growing numbers of people with the virus both in our community as well as around the state, world really we just felt it important to begin to tighten down further on activities so that we can, to use a well-worn phrase, flatten the curve and keep people safe. We have to take care of our community because we do have Fort Campbell in our community we want to make sure we protect our soldiers and their families as well, so that’s another reason why we are taking this next step,” Mayor Pitts explained.

It’s a step that many have called on Governor Bill Lee to make across the state.

“It would be nice to have a consistent message and I think more Mayors and community leaders are sensing that, so you are beginning to see a trend in that direction,” said Pitts. 

The ‘shelter-in-place’ order closes the doors to a long list of businesses that are not essential. While others like healthcare, banking, food production and gas stations will remain open.

Mayor Pitts says law enforcement will help regulate the order, but that they are not going to take a “heavy-handed approach.”

“We are not going to arrest people as a last result we will issue citations, but we don’t expect that to be a problem. I just beg people’s forbearance and patience while we try to do our part.”

The orders will go into effect at 12:01 a.m. April 1 and remain in effect until April 8. The orders can then be extended in seven-day increments.

COVID-19 in Tennessee

(This reflects what the TDH is reporting each day at 2 p.m. CST )

Coronavirus-related deaths in Tennessee

County# of Deaths
Anderson1
Bedford2
Benton1
Blount3
Bradley1
Campbell1
Carroll1
Carter1
Cumberland1
Davidson25
Fayette1
Franklin1
Gibson1
Greene2
Grundy1
Hamblen2
Hamilton13
Hawkins2
Haywood1
Humphreys1
Knox5
Macon3
Madison1
Marion1
Marshall1
McMinn1
Monroe1
Montgomery2
Obion1
Putnam5
Rutherford11
Sevier1
Shelby44
Smith1
Sullivan1
Sumner37
Trousdale1
Williamson9
Wilson4
Out of state3
Total Deaths (as of 4/29/20)195


Most patients with COVID-19 have a mild respiratory illness including fever, cough and shortness of breath. The Tennessee Department of Health strongly encourages Tennesseans to wash your hands often with soap and water and to not touch your eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.

The CDC recommends that organizers (whether groups or individuals) cancel or postpone in-person events that consist of 10 people or more throughout the United States.

High-risk individuals are defined as adults over 60 years old or people of any age with serious chronic medical conditions such as: Heart disease, diabetes, or lung disease.

The Tennessee Department of Health offers a COVID-19 Public Information Line at 877-857-2945, with information available daily from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Central Time.

Stay with News 2 for continuing coverage of the COVID-19 Pandemic.

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