Developer says he will 'preserve' RCA Studio A or move on - WKRN News 2

Developer says he will 'preserve' RCA Studio A or move on

Posted: Updated: Jun 29, 2014 08:17 PM
Ben Folds wrote an open letter to Nashville to save places like Studio A because of their musical heritage. Ben Folds wrote an open letter to Nashville to save places like Studio A because of their musical heritage.
Courtesy: Facebook.com Courtesy: Facebook.com
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -

"We have saved a historic building for awhile" seemed to be a general reaction to word late Friday that a Brentwood developer would not move ahead with imminent plans to tear down Nashville's RCA Studio A.

Many who attended the meeting at the studio Friday, however, wondered what would happen when the next developer comes along.

Tim Reynolds, who owns Bravo Development, told News 2 he had planned to close on the property Monday, but in a statement said, "The only way Bravo Development would consummate its purchase of the property is if we would preserve and incorporate Studio A into our overall project design."

The statement continued, "With that said, the engineers and architects for the project would have to determine whether it would be feasible or possible to incorporate into our design. If it's determined that it is not feasible then Bravo Development will withdraw from our plans to develop the project."

The studio on Nashville's famed Music Row is a place first developed nearly 50 years ago by the legendary Chet Atkins, who orchestrated the Nashville Sound of the 1960s in the nondescript, three-story building.

In the years since, a long line of performers who go by names like Elvis, Dolly, Willie and now Hunter Hayes have recorded there.

Earlier this week, singer-songwriter Ben Folds, who is now the main tenant of the studio, wrote an open letter to Nashville to save places like Studio A because of their musical heritage.

He was out of town as nearly three dozen members of the Music Row community met Friday to figure out how they could convince the Brentwood developer that the studio needed to be preserved.

The group included songwriters, producers, lawyers, publicists and investors who seemed to agree that the Nashville community needs to educate the public on the value of places where so much music has been made that's heard everywhere.

"Studios come and go in Nashville, but this one laid some of the bricks of our music, that has reached people all over the world," said songwriter Trey Bruce, who has penned several No. 1 hits.

While they talked about preserving such places, demolition could be heard just across the alley of a former studio.

Many at the meeting said Kris Kristofferson recorded some of his legendary songs there.

Despite a reprieve for Studio A, the group plans to go ahead Monday morning with an event out in front of the building to highlight the music history made inside aging walls.

We want to get a group of concerned people together that are concerned about the fate of Music Row,” Sharon Corbitt-House told News 2.

“We are starting to lose some of our landmarks,” she added.

The event will be held at 9 a.m.  For details, visit the Facebook event page, "Save RCA Studio A."

A management spokesperson for Ben Folds says the artist plans to be present at the rally.

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