Non-profit gives amputees ability to compete in sports - WKRN News 2

Non-profit gives amputees ability to compete in sports

Posted: Updated: Feb 18, 2014 05:31 PM CST
Troy Cronin, 17, came from Massachusetts to pick up his new blade runners. Troy Cronin, 17, came from Massachusetts to pick up his new blade runners.
Noah McLaughlin (Courtesy: Amputee Blade Runners) Noah McLaughlin (Courtesy: Amputee Blade Runners)
Noah McLaughlin played in his first basketball game Tuesday night. Noah McLaughlin played in his first basketball game Tuesday night.
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -

A Nashville organization is giving feet to athletes who want to run and compete with every other athlete.

Amputee Blade Runners is a non-profit organization that provides and fits athletes with specialized prosthetic legs and feet.

"What we provide to our runners are a sports specific prosthetic," explained Daryl Farler, a double amputee who works with the organization.

He continued, "We provide them with anything from just a running leg to a leg they can play basketball with, or soccer."

Troy Cronin, a 17-year-old from Massachusetts, raised $2,000 to make the trip to Nashville to receive his new prosthetics.

The teen lost both of his lower legs from a bout with bacterial meningitis when he was just two years old.

"These legs will help me run with less pressure onto my legs and there will be less friction," Cronin said.

On Sunday, Cronin was fitted with the prosthesis and is getting accustomed to them before heading home at the end of the week.

"I appreciate all the hard work they're putting in, and time," Cronin told News 2. "Because without them, I don't think I would have any blades or sports feet."

On Tuesday night, a second prosthetic recipient, Noah McLaughlin of Williamson County, played his first basketball game with the help of a running prosthetic.

McLaughlin was born with no fingers and without the lower portion of his right leg.

"He's always positive. You never hear him complain, things he can't do, he asks for help, and things he can he just does it. When you watch him like when he gets dressed, or just puts on his leg, just normal things. He just blows my mind," Father Cameron McLaughlin said proudly.

Noah McLaughlin helped lead his team to victory 35-31.

According to the non-profit organization's Web site, running prosthetics are not covered by insurance because companies deem them not medically necessary.

Runner's blades can cost as much as $50,000 for the pair.

Currently, the Amputee Blade Runners has provided prosthetics to athletes in 18 states with a goal of reaching at least one athlete in every state.

Athletes apply for grants to be accepted into the program. The organization is funded by its founder and other local charities.

Powered by WorldNow

441 Murfreesboro Road Nashville, TN 37210

Telephone: 615.369.7222
Fax: 615.369.7329
Email: news@wkrn.com

Can’t find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Young Broadcasting of Nashville, LLC. A Media General Company.