Thousands of crows roost in Midtown trees - WKRN News 2

Thousands of crows roost in Midtown trees

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The crows leave the trees each morning around 5 a.m. The crows leave the trees each morning around 5 a.m.
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -

Some unwelcome visitors have moved into Midtown Nashville, leaving residents with some sleepless nights and in need of a car wash.

Thousands of crows have recently roosted in the trees in Midtown.

The birds have a tendency to wake up early and make a lot of noise, before taking off for the day to search for food.

Residents told News 2 the birds have been staying in the trees every night for nearly a week.

The large, black birds show up to roost around dark each night, and then start cawing around 5 a.m. each morning.

"One crow will start," said Midtown resident Charlie Fenner. "And all of a sudden, it catches on to all hundreds or thousands of them. And it's just intense."

The crows also leave behind large amounts of droppings on the ground, cars and rooftops.  

Joe deGraauw, Avian Curator of the Nashville Zoo at Grassmere, said the birds tend to roost in large numbers this time of year and stay there until just before mating season in late March.

"For the most part, nothing to worry about except walking below the tree where they've been roosting the night before," said deGraauw.

Vanderbilt University has had problems with crows and blackbirds in years past.

Vanderbilt has even used noise cannons to try and harass the birds into roosting in another location.

Construction on Vanderbilt University's campus could have pushed the birds into abandoning their normal roosting spots and moving to other areas of Nashville.

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