More sleep could be key to teens making better grades - WKRN News 2

More sleep could be key to teens making better grades

Posted:
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -

Science is showing the key to students making higher grades could be as easy getting more sleep each night.

News 2 spoke with local neurologist and sleep specialist Dr. Michael Yu who said early school start times may not be so beneficial to students.

"The adolescent mind doesn't fully awaken until a much later time then we thought in the past," explained Dr. Yu.

According to Yu, 12-year-olds through young twenties need about nine hours of sleep per night.

"Waking up at 6:30, 6 o'clock or even earlier, just effectively makes them sleep deprived," he said.

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan recently made news when he recommended a later start time for schools.

"Overall I think there has to be an emphasis on why sleep is important to these children's development," Yu said.

News 2 contacted several local school districts who all start class before 8 a.m. said they are not considering a time change, mostly because parents like it the way it is.

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