Tenn. continues to lose battle against childhood obesity - WKRN News 2

Tenn. continues to lose battle against childhood obesity

Posted:
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -

A new study focused on low income preschool children discovered more evidence that Tennessee is losing its battle with childhood obesity.

"Obesity in most cases is more energy in and less energy out, so we have an imbalance," explained Pediatrician Dr. Lindy Fenlason.

She continued, "If our environment is such where were are not doing a lot of physical activity, if we are not walking, we are driving, we are not active, if we do not have access to healthy foods, that is going to put us at a higher risk for imbalance."

According to health officials, Tennessee's low income children have been struggling with an imbalance for years.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls childhood obesity a looming health crisis since children can go on to grow up to face serious illnesses.

"Obesity affects everybody.  We know that we are most concerned about is some of the chronic illnesses it puts us at risk for diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure. There are also psychological affects to obesity as well," Dr. Fenlason said.

Despite federal WIC programs giving low income families access to healthier food options, Dr. Fenlason said there is still a need for education that will teach families to make the most of those choices.

According to Dr. Fenlason, one of the best ways to keep tabs on your child's obesity risks is by talking with a doctor during regular check ups.

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