Family says son added to transplant list after first denial - WKRN News 2

Family says son added to transplant list after hospital first denied him

Posted: Updated: Aug 14, 2013 01:29 AM
ATLANTA -

A 15-year-old Georgia boy's family said he was finally added to the transplant list after they were told that their loved one did not qualify for a life-saving heart transplant.

Anthony Stokes, who suffers from an enlarged heart, has been hospitalized for the past six months.

Doctors told the teen and his family he only has six months to live due to the condition.

However, according to a letter, doctors previously decided Stokes was ineligible for the transplant due to his history of "non-compliance."

"They say they don't have any evidence showing that he would take his medicine, and he wouldn't have any follow-up care," mother Melencia Hamilton said.

Doctors were not specific in the letter, but family members said they have been told Stokes did not qualify for the transplant due to his history of bad grades and run-ins with the law.

"I know it's wrong, because if they get to know him, they will love him," Hamilton said.  

"I want doctors to give me an opportunity," Stokes said from his hospital room.

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta since released a statement Monday that read, "The well-being of our patients is always our first priority. We are continuing to work with this family and looking at all options regarding this patient's healthcare. We follow very specific criteria in determining eligibility for a transplant of any kind."

On Wednesday, the teen's family reported to ABC News that the hospital changed their minds, and Anthony has been added to the transplant list.

*ABC News contributed to this report.

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