How Experienced Storm Chasers Became Victims - WKRN News 2

How Experienced Storm Chasers Became Victims

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The Weather Channel's Storm Chase Vehicle The Weather Channel's Storm Chase Vehicle
Zig-zag path of tornado Zig-zag path of tornado
Shifting directions of tornado warning polygons Shifting directions of tornado warning polygons

It really hit home when I heard that Mike Bettes and his Weather Channel colleagues were thrown 200 yards through the air by the Oklahoma City tornado on Friday.

Luckily, Mike and his friends are OK with only minor injuries.

Mike is former News 2 Meteorologist Allison Chinchar's husband, so many of us here were concerned.

Unfortunately, experienced Storm Chasers Tim Samaras, his son Paul Samaras, and colleague Carl Young were killed.

There are always a lot of people out there chasing who don't have a clue of what they are doing. 

However, these were all experienced storm chasers who really know how to position themselves  to the storms.

Tim Samaras is a scientist who has done a lot of research for universities, and other organizations.  He is also known for the show "Storm Chasers" on The Discovery Channel.

In the CNN link below, Chad Myers explains Tim's background well.

So how did this happen?

Look at the graphics to the right and see the zig-zag path the multiple vortex tornado took, first turning left, then right, lifting and then reforming.

Also notice the red polygon tornado warnings in the radar picture and how they shift directions.

Tornadoes are known to turn to the right when intensifying, but that zig-zag may have a lot to do with the multiple vortices.

Below are links from CNN & The Weather Channel:

CNN:

http://www.cnn.com/2013/06/02/us/midwest-weather/index.html

TWC:

http://www.weather.com/video/tornado-hits-twc-crew-37092

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