Remains of missing Tenn. Korean War soldier returns home - WKRN News 2

Remains of missing Tenn. Korean War soldier returns home

Posted: Updated: Jan 10, 2013 04:46 PM
Private First Class Glenn Schoenmann left his home in Palmer, Tennessee at the age of 18 to fight in the Korean War. Private First Class Glenn Schoenmann left his home in Palmer, Tennessee at the age of 18 to fight in the Korean War.
Glenn Schoenmann's siblings were at the Nashville airport to welcome their brother home. Glenn Schoenmann's siblings were at the Nashville airport to welcome their brother home.
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -

After 62 years, a Volunteer State veteran is finally reunited with his family.

Private First Class Glenn Schoenmann left his home in Palmer, Tennessee at the age of 18 to fight in the Korean War.

"He knew where he was going and he told me, he said, 'I don't think I'm ever going to come home alive.' That was hard," said Ernest Schoenmann, Glenn's brother.

It was hard, because as his older brother, Ernest believed Glenn was probably right.

"It's certainly a wonderful day," said Edna Kilgore, Glenn's younger sister. "It's something we probably didn't think would ever come about."

Kilgore remembers her brother as a happy person who loved to play guitar, and volunteered to fight in the Army, rather than go through the draft.

After decades of wondering what happened to him, Glenn's family finally got an answer.

"Just before Thanksgiving, I got the news," said Ernest. "A fellow called me and said we've found your brother's remains."

Edna and Ernest gave DNA samples so their brother's remains could be positively identified.

"This symbolizes the culmination of the effort, the hope, the dreams of so many American families whose loved ones have either been imprisoned, captured or missing," said Many-Bears Grinder, the Tennessee Department of Veterans Affairs Commissioner.

Grinder added, "This day demonstrates the will of the United States to bring everyone home."

It's believed Glenn died as a prisoner of war at the age of 19 in 1950, but the family is still learning about what happened.

"They [the government] gave me a booklet," explained Ernest, "And in the booklet there was an interview with one of the boys who was in prison with him and I started to read it, but I couldn't read it. It was so horrible."

"Just heartbroken, but happy," said Edna, "We're so thankful he's getting to come home with this honor."

All of Glenn's siblings received gold star pins to symbolize his sacrifice.

Glenn's funeral will be Saturday in at 1 p.m. at Grundy County High School.

He will be buried afterwards at the Brown's Chapel Cemetery in Palmer.

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