Dial-a-doctor gives residents easier access to care - WKRN News 2

Dial-a-doctor gives residents easier access to care

Posted: Updated: Dec 4, 2012 04:54 PM
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -

Tennessee residents can now "visit" a doctor by telephone for relief from minor ailments.
 
The new Doctor on Call service, offered by Arizona-based Apogee Physicians, began service Monday, charging $50 per contact for physician consultations.
 
Area residents or people traveling through Tennessee can reach Apogee Doctor on Call by dialing 1-888-353-4555 toll-free any time of the day, seven days a week.

Apogee Physicians said Tennessee is the pilot state for its remote program, partly because the company already provides staffing at a dozen hospitals around the state.
 
Queries are answered around the clock, seven days a week.  Doctors cannot prescribe narcotics, but can message pharmacies for routine prescriptions, such as antibiotics.
 
"If you look at the statistics, many of the folks that go to the E. R. or urgent care centers don't need to be at that level of care.  If they had access to a physician, they can safely be cared for with just a telephone," said Apogee physician Dr. Steve Cervi-Skinner.

Callers must be 18-years old, no one younger than three years of age can be treated, and patients must have a Visa, Mastercard, or PayPal account.

The service costs $50.

Interested patients can visit ApogeeDoctorOnCall.com for more information.

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