Ticks raise new concerns in Tennessee - WKRN News 2

Ticks raise new concerns in Tennessee

Posted:

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - Ticks are raising new concerns in Tennessee as new types and infections emerge.

Certain species of ticks that were uncommon in the state are being found in new areas.

Ticks that were previously rare in Tennessee, such as Gulf Coast and deer ticks, have now been found to be much more widespread, possibly because of climate change, according to The Tennessean newspaper.

Both are associated with tick-borne infections.

Tick-related illnesses have more than doubled in Tennessee since 2005.

There were almost 400 cases last year, most of them Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Six people have died from Rocky Mountain fever in the state since 2001.

Ticks typically get active when weather becomes warm in the spring. Infection reports peak in June and July.

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

 

  • HealthMore>>

  • FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    © FDA© FDA
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.More >>
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.More >>
  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
  • 1 in 13 U.S. schoolkids takes psych meds

    1 in 13 U.S. schoolkids takes psych meds

    More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, a new government report shows.More >>
    More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, a new government report shows.More >>
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and WKRN (Young Broadcasting station). All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.